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Posts Tagged ‘Labour Market’

Improving Inclusivity: The Need for Accessible Labour Market Information

As a recent immigrant, I often find myself drawing comparisons between my home country, the United States, and my adopted country, Canada. Despite many similarities in language, culture and quality of life, subtle differences occasionally catch me off guard. One that stands out in particular is the value Canadians place on inclusivity. From celebrating diversity…Read More

Supporting Immigrants with Labour Market information

Last week, I had the privilege of representing LMIC at the 5th Biennial Ottawa Immigration Forum organized by the Ottawa Local Immigration Partnership Group (OLIP). Based on our public opinion research findings on recent immigrants, I discussed the importance of labour market information (LMI) in supporting newcomers settling in and integrating to Canada. This blog highlights the key takeaways from that presentation.…Read More

Gender Earning Difference Across Income Levels: Still a ways to go

LMIC at CRDCN I recently had the opportunity to present LMIC’s work at the Canadian Research Data Centre Network (CRDCN) national conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia. At this conference, researchers and government agencies gather to learn about and discuss how micro data available at Statistics Canada’s research data centres (RDCs) can be used to create groundbreaking new…Read More

If You Do What You Love, Will the Money Follow?

Choosing a career can be a daunting task. Much like trying to define “success,” it can mean different things to different people. For some, it’s about passion. Proverbial advice such as “find what you do best and get someone to pay you for doing it” or “choose a job you love, and you will never…Read More

The Young and not so Restless: Breaking Misconceptions About NEET Youth

What are the challenges faced by youth who are not in school or part of the labour market? This is a question we are still grappling with despite historically low national unemployment rates. According to Statistics Canada, in September 2018 there were 779,000 young people, aged 15 to 29, not in employment, education or training (NEET).…Read More