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Posts Tagged ‘Future of Work’

Obama’s Sage Advice for Young Canadians on the Future of Work

On January 23, I joined 6,000 others gathered at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre to hear former President Barack Obama share his thoughts on the rapidly changing world of work. As a young person, I was invited to attend this first event in the Future of Work & New Economy Series hosted by the Economic…Read More

Improving Inclusivity: The Need for Accessible Labour Market Information

As a recent immigrant, I often find myself drawing comparisons between my home country, the United States, and my adopted country, Canada. Despite many similarities in language, culture and quality of life, subtle differences occasionally catch me off guard. One that stands out in particular is the value Canadians place on inclusivity. From celebrating diversity…Read More

If You Do What You Love, Will the Money Follow?

Choosing a career can be a daunting task. Much like trying to define “success,” it can mean different things to different people. For some, it’s about passion. Proverbial advice such as “find what you do best and get someone to pay you for doing it” or “choose a job you love, and you will never…Read More

Understanding and Dealing with Labour and Skill Shortages

On April 9, LMIC participated in the Ottawa Economics Association and Canadian Association Business Economics 2019 Spring Policy Conference. The annual conference is an opportunity for economics, business and policy professionals to come together to discuss and share ideas on the most important economic issues in Canada. This year’s conference explored the ways in which Canada can build resiliency for the future.…Read More

Disruption, distribution, and data

On February 27th, we participated in the 2019 Building Connections conference organized by the Ottawa Employment Hub. It was an opportunity to bring together policy makers, academics, think tanks, and practitioners to discuss a wide range of issues. Emerging approaches to exploring and promoting careers, workforce development best practices, and the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) and automation…Read More

Not Your Average “Future of Work” Event

The world of work is changing. This is evident by the number of new job opportunities stemming from technological advancement, the restructuring/disruption of jobs, and the burgeoning field of predicting future job gains and losses. Since I am an economist at LMIC and a board member of the Ottawa Economics Association (OEA), these emerging and uncertain trends are…Read More

Bridging the knowledge gap in the future of work: A Canadian perspective

The future of work is one of the hottest topics these days, both in Canada and abroad. When I joined LMIC in June, I jumped into researching this important and fascinating area. As Tony mentioned in his recent blog, our team at LMIC started reviewing the future of work literature and creating an annotated bibliography of these reports. Our second LMI Insights: The…Read More

Making sense of the future of work in Canada

When I joined LMIC in April, one of my first priorities was to help provide insights on the jobs of today and tomorrow. To that end, my team and I began investigating the immense area of research and analysis known as the “future of work.” The variety of studies in this area touches on everything from…Read More

Nothing is more difficult to predict than the future

Yogi Berra was probably as good a philosopher as he was a baseball catcher, which, if you know anything about baseball, says a lot about how revered he was in terms of his “catch” phrases. One that sticks with me is “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” Yet, no topic is seemingly more in vogue…Read More

We need to better understand how the world of work is changing

Not a day goes by when there isn’t an article, a tweet, a post or a new study on how fast the world of work is changing. Advances in new technologies are taking up most of the spotlight but other forces, such as population ageing and climate change – which some argue may be more…Read More