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Future of Work

COVID-19: Our Commitment to Canadians

The decisions Canadians make about jobs, careers, education, training and workforce development just got a lot tougher. We at LMIC are discussing how to best serve our stakeholders with content that is relevant in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the meantime we will reduce our publishing and social media activities and encourage all…Read More

Obama’s Sage Advice for Young Canadians on the Future of Work

On January 23, I joined 6,000 others gathered at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre to hear former President Barack Obama share his thoughts on the rapidly changing world of work. As a young person, I was invited to attend this first event in the Future of Work & New Economy Series hosted by the Economic…Read More

Dial up your skills for the future

I recently came across the BuzzFeed article “24 Pictures Old Millennials Can Hear, Even if They Haven’t Heard Them in Years.” As a sucker for ’90s nostalgia, I couldn’t click fast enough. Picture number three is of the iconic America Online (AOL) mailbox, which, as promised, immediately caused my brain to chime “You’ve Got Mail.”…Read More

Demography, immigration and labour market transformation: threats or opportunities?

On May 29-30, 2019, ASDEQ (Association des économistes québécois) held its annual conference in Quebec City. This year’s theme of demography, immigration and labour market transformation dovetails with our expertise and exploration of the future of work. During the two-day conference, I gathered a few insights on labour market information and our work at the LMIC…Read More

Disruption, distribution, and data

On February 27th, we participated in the 2019 Building Connections conference organized by the Ottawa Employment Hub. It was an opportunity to bring together policy makers, academics, think tanks, and practitioners to discuss a wide range of issues. Emerging approaches to exploring and promoting careers, workforce development best practices, and the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) and automation…Read More

The future of work – at LMIC

We’ve only just begun Back in October of last year, LinkedIn’s pop-up notification of “Say Congrats” on my first work anniversary inspired me to look back at my first 365 days with the Labour Market Information Council (LMIC). This first year was marked with considerable progress, but our work had only just begun. I am proud…Read More

Not Your Average “Future of Work” Event

The world of work is changing. This is evident by the number of new job opportunities stemming from technological advancement, the restructuring/disruption of jobs, and the burgeoning field of predicting future job gains and losses. Since I am an economist at LMIC and a board member of the Ottawa Economics Association (OEA), these emerging and uncertain trends are…Read More

Bridging the knowledge gap in the future of work: A Canadian perspective

The future of work is one of the hottest topics these days, both in Canada and abroad. When I joined LMIC in June, I jumped into researching this important and fascinating area. As Tony mentioned in his recent blog, our team at LMIC started reviewing the future of work literature and creating an annotated bibliography of these reports. Our second LMI Insights: The…Read More

Making sense of the future of work in Canada

When I joined LMIC in April, one of my first priorities was to help provide insights on the jobs of today and tomorrow. To that end, my team and I began investigating the immense area of research and analysis known as the “future of work.” The variety of studies in this area touches on everything from…Read More

Nothing is more difficult to predict than the future

Yogi Berra was probably as good a philosopher as he was a baseball catcher, which, if you know anything about baseball, says a lot about how revered he was in terms of his “catch” phrases. One that sticks with me is “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” Yet, no topic is seemingly more in vogue…Read More